Armed violence and development

Gun violence exacerbates poverty. At the same time, poverty provides the ideal breeding ground for gun violence. Sustainable development is undermined as long as this cycle remains unbroken.

Lost productivity due to homicides alone is conservatively estimated at between USD $95 and 163 billion each year. An estimated 60% of these homicides were carried out with firearms. Violence due to armed conflict can also decrease the annual growth of a typical economy by 2%.

The UN General Assembly has acknowledged this link between gun violence and development, as did the 2005 World Summit. Many countries support the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence & Development, which seeks to achieve measurable reductions in the global burden of armed violence by 2015.

 

Latest news

A new website has been launched where people are encouraged to become virtual citizens of Costa Rica, a country with no army.

The Global Youth Network of Religions for Peace is advancing a United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) resolution that asks member states to cut military spending by 10% and redirect those funds toward achievement of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) of Costa Rica has initiated a petition demanding an embargo on the shipment of weapons to Latin America and the declaration of Latin America as an arms-free zone.

In Mozambique, more than 70 people participated in a debate on 8 July about the role of an ATT to counter the impact of armed violence on the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Experts on violence against women discussed the methodological challenges and the state of research on the costs, consequences and manifestation of gender violence during a workshop organised by the Geneva Declaration on Armed Violence and Development, 25-26 March.

Latest resources

Despite the signing of the 2006 Peace Accords, political, economic, and social violence continue to simmer across Nepal, according to the Small Arms Survey.

Africa suffers enormously from conflict and armed violence. As well as the human tragedy, armed conflict costs Africa around $18bn per year, seriously derailing development.

This report by the UN Secretary-General was submitted to the UN Security Council to bring them up to date on issues that were presented to them in the 2008 SG report on Small Arms

On 3 March, members of the Control Arms Campaign addressed the UN, as part of the second session of the Preparatory Committee on the Arms Trade Tready (ATT).

The Geneva Declaration is an ongoing process between UN Members States, UN agencies and civil society seeking to reduce the impact of armed violence on sustainable development. The website includes data, case studies and other resources.

The UN Development Program has a variety of projects aiming to prevent armed violence from undermining poverty reduction.

The Working Group on Armed Violence and Development is now on Facebook.

IANSA member APP presented its new book “International Arms Transfers Control” on 3 June at a Mercosur government meeting in Buenos Aires (Argentina).

This report explores the links between small arms control and the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and the Accra Agenda for Action, the principle international standards for aid effectiveness.

A number of countries now support the 2010 Oslo Commitments, seeking to reduce armed violence as part of achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

A new article analyses the connections between crime and the economic and political situation in Uruguay.

A new report “Stopping the Destructive Spread of Small Arms” discusses the challenges that gun proliferation poses for sustainable security and development.

This 2009 report from the UN Secretary-General recommends that armed violence prevention should be part of the review process for the Millennium Development Goals. It also recommends that armed violence prevention programmes recognise the gendered nature of armed violence.

The UN Secretary-General requested the views of countries on the links between armed violence and sustainable development. Read what your country submitted.

This 2008 resolution of the UN General Assembly stresses the need for a coherent and integrated approach to the prevention of armed violence, with a view to achieving sustainable peace and development.

This report by the UN Secretary General came as response to a statement from the UN Security Council in 2007, requesting that they receive a report on small arms every two years

Globally, there is very little information on the true costs of armed violence. This UN manual provides a methodology to allow national researchers to collect and analyse data on the costs of injuries, including gun injuries.

Irresponsible arms transfers are undermining many developing countries’ chances of achieving their Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets.

A 2005 summary of UNDP’s work to reduce armed violence, including case studies. It also contains a table showing how gun violence undermines the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

This report from the Control Arms Campaign includes a methodology for allowing government arms export officials to determine if the transfer is likely to undermine development in the recipient country.